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Lycopodium Powder

Lycoppodium powder is commercially gathered during the summer months in China. This fine, dust-like yellowish powder is composed of the dry spores of clubmoss plant and it is retrieved by shaking the renal-shaped capsules borne on such small evergreen plants.

Heavy Lycopodium

Clubmoss spores are considered to have medicinal properties and for years were used in dusting powders formulated to treat conditions such as eczema, intertrigo, herpes, and ulcers. In times past, pharmacist would place the water repellent powdered spores into pillboxes to keep the contents from adhering to each other.


Lycopodium powder has numerous commercial uses, some of which are:

Educational use: Lycopodium powder is one of the most popular teaching tools used to demonstrate dust explosion.
Although, not particularly flammable, when dispersed in air, the surface area of this powder surrounded by oxigen increases greatly, which allows for combusion to occur.
Dispersing the powder in the air helps lycopodium to ignite easily and burn explosively. This is due to its high fact content and large surface area surrounded by oxygen molecules.



3 Important Uses of Lycopodium Spore Powder

Lycopodium powder is odorless and tasteless. This powder can float very well in cool water, but sinks in boiling water.


Popular by its widespread names such as Club Moss, Wolf’s Claw, Fox Tail, Running Pine, and Lamb’s Tail and native to both North America and Europe, Lycopodium is simply an evergreen plant, which is used as homeopathic remedy. Since the middle ages, this homeopathic remedy is usually very effective for conditions like gout, digestive orders, kidney stones and water retention. One can find various Lycopodium Spore Powder Suppliers In UK supplying high grade Lycopodium Spore Powder.
 

Lycopodium powder has numerous commercial uses, some of which are:
Educational use: Lycododium powder is one of the most popular teaching tools used to demonstrate dust explosions. Although, not particularly flammable, when dispersed in air, the surface area of this powder surrounded by oxygen increases greatly, which allows for combustion to occur. Dispersing the powder in the air helps lycopodium to ignite easily and burn explosively. This is due to its high fat content and large surface area surrounded by oxygen molecules.


Homeopathic medicine: Lycopodium has been used as a homeopathic medicine since the middle ages to treat a number of ailments. This homeopathic remedy is prepared by extracting the pollen from the Lycopodium spores. Lycopodium clavatum is utilized in homeopathic medicine as a cure for disorders of the urinary and digestive systems and for liver disfunction. Moreover, Lycopodium spores can also be employed outwardly for wounds and eczema.


Drying Agent: Lycopodium powder can resist wetting. Hence, it is best suitable to powder latex surgical gloves in order to make them easier to put on. It can also be used as a pill coating so as to avoid newly made pills from sticking together.
So, these are three important uses of Lycopodium powder, which makes this substance a useful homeopathic remedy.
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Flash powder:

When mixed with air, the spores are highly flammable because of their high fat content and their large surface area per unit of volume — a single spore's diameter is about 33 micrometers (μm).[2] Preferred source species are Lycopodium clavatum (wolf's-foot clubmoss) and Diphasiastrum digitatum (common groundcedar) because these widespread and often locally abundant species are both prolific in their spore production and easy to collect.[citation needed]

Lycopodium has been used in fireworks and explosives, fingerprint powders, as a covering for pills, and as an ice cream stabilizer. Today, the principal use of the powder is to create flashes or flames that are large and impressive but relatively easy to manage safely in magic acts and for cinema and theatrical special effects. Lycopodium powder is also sometimes used as a lubricating dust on skin-contacting latex (natural rubber) goods, such as condoms and medical gloves.[3]

In physics experiments and demonstrations, lycopodium powder is used to make sound waves in air visible for observation and measurement, and to make a pattern of electrostatic charge visible. The powder is also highly hydrophobic; if the surface of a cup of water is coated with lycopodium powder, a finger or other object inserted straight into the cup will come out dusted with the powder but remain perfectly dry.

Because of the very small size of its particles, lycopodium powder can be used to demonstrate Brownian motion. A microscope slide, with or without a well, is prepared with a droplet of water, and a fine dusting of lycopodium powder is applied. Then, a cover-glass can be placed over the water and spore sample in order to reduce convection in the water by evaporation. Under several hundred diameters magnification, one will see in the microscope, when well focused upon individual lycopodium particles, that the spore particles "dance" randomly. This is in response to asymmetric collisional forces applied to the macroscopic (but still quite small) powder particle by microscopic water molecules in random thermal motion. The lycopodium particles appear to be "alive", but they are only inert particles being buffeted by forces which, again, because of the small size of the lycopodium particles, respond to the momentum applied to them, which does not quite average to zero in three dimensions. Thus, the particles move.

As a then-common laboratory supply, lycopodium powder was often used by inventors developing experimental prototypes. For example, Nicéphore Niépce used lycopodium powder in the fuel for the first internal combustion engine, the Pyréolophore, about 1807,[citation needed] and Chester Carlson used lycopodium powder in 1938 in his early experiments to demonstrate xerography.[4]

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